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Author: Field, Alison E.; Austin, S. Bryn; Camargo Jr., Carlos A.; Taylor, C. Barr; Striegel-Moore, Ruth H.; Loud, Keith J.; Colditz, Graham A.
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CMCH Synopsis: Over 10,000 adolescent males and females completed a survey wherethey reported their height and weight, physical activity, weight and body shape concerns, and whether they used products (such as protein shakes and steroids) to improve physical appearance, strength, or muscle mass.

Very few adolescents reported frequent use of such products, with 4.7% of males and 1.6% of females reporting weekly use. Adolescents who thought frequently about wanting greater muscle definition or who wanted to gain weight, as well as male adolescents who read men's health-fitness magazines, were significantly more likely to use these products.

These results suggest that, although the reported use of supplemental products among teens was relatively rare, the teens who did use them were more likely to be dissatisfied with their bodies or to use media more often. Center on Media and Child Health
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Year: 2005
Article Title: Exposure to the mass media, body shape concerns, and use of supplements to improve weight and shape among male and female adolescents
Journal: Pediatrics
Volume: 116
Issue: 116
Pages: 214-220
ISSN: 1120-7507
Source of Funding: National Institutes of Health grants DK-46834 and DK-59570; Boston Obesity Nutrition Research Center grant DK46200; Kellogg Company; Center on Media and Child Health; American Cancer Society Research Professorship
Study Design: Correlational Study
Publication Type: Journal Article
URL:
Age Group: Adolescence (13-17 yrs)
Keywords: Adolescent Attitudes
Adolescents
Body Dissatisfaction
Body Image
Drugs (Pharmaceutical)
Drugs (Pharmaceutical) (Media Content)
Femininity (Media Content)
Fitness
Fitness (Media Content)
Gender Differences
Health Behavior
Magazines
Masculinity (Media Content)
Media Diet
Medicine
Muscles
Nutrition
Perception
Physical Activity
Physical Appearance
Print Media
Self Perception
Sociology
Sports
Sports (Media Content)
Steroids
Television
Weight
Weight Gain
Weight Loss

 

 

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